Job Searching Using Social Media Tools

A very good friend recently asked me to help her nephew, Steve.  He is a recent college graduate looking for a job in the business operations  field of Supply Chain Management.  This blog post is a copy of a recent email to Steve about the use of social media tools like blogs, FaceBook and LinkedIn in his job search.  I think it’s pretty self explanatory so I just copied it verbatim.

Perhaps you’ll see something helpful in this too. Maybe you’ll think I’m all wet. Either is fine with me but either way, let me know what you think. I want to learn from you.

Steve,

Regarding FaceBook, there is a very broad range of opinion about how open you should be. I have mine set so that my friends and their networks can see my stuff. Not wide open but if we have any connection at all, you can probably get to me. I have found FaceBook to be a great tool to get to know people that are casually in my orbit. This has accelerated personal relationships with several people that I previously only knew through work or as acquaintences through mutual friends or activities.In the end you have to be comfortable with how much of you is out there for others to see. There are no wrong answers.

My search engine comment was really around things like Monster.com and other job search sites. You can set up profiles and custom searches to have job leads emailed to you on a regular basis. I get daily emails from Monster and CareerBuilder that typically have 5 – 8 specific job postings each. I discard most of them but probably have 2 or 3 a week worth pursuing. Also look for professional associations (and groups on LinkedIn) – many have job postings that anyone can get to. Many are for members only but it’s worth looking – organizations are losing members fast because professional dues are often first-cut expenses. Some progressive organizations recognize this and are offering free or deeply discounted services to earn your loyalty for when your budgets return.

Finally look for supply-chain blogs (and other professional topics that interest you) and on-line publications. Subscribe to their RSS feeds through a tool like Google Reader. Yahoo.com has a good reader also. This way you can have info aggregated in a single spot that you can scan quickly on a regular basis for things of interest without having to bang around dozens of sites to find. I believe in turning on the fire hose of information and then drinking what you can. In my view it’s better to see data and discard it than to not see it at all. Just beware that it takes discipline (which I often lack) to not get sucked down into time-wasting rabbit holes chasing cool but irrelevant ideas.

Hope this helps. I’ll let you know if I have any specific comments about your LinkedIn profile.

Best,
John

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City Blogs

I’ve added a box on the right titled, City Blogs. This morning, I stumbled across a post about deep-fried candy bars (no joke) from a blog called All Over Albany. AOA is a nice site full of things to do and be proud of  if you find yourself in Albany, New York.  I have also provided the link to the blog (online newsletter, actually) Cincinnati Soapbox, a great site that has done a lot to promote good news in the Queen City. OK, my bias is showing. Cincinnati is my hometown and I know the creators of Soapbox but it’s still a great example of how to do it right.

The use of social networking tools like Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and blogs to promote people and their organizations, businesses, interests and ideas is still in it’s early stages but is expanding rapidly. I am especially interested in how communities (neighborhoods, cities,  regions and states) can use these tools to promote themselves to attract and retain businesses, attract workers and strengthen the connections among the people who already live and work there.

If you know of a blog from a community like this, send me the link. I’ll post them and build a resource for others that want to find best practice examples of how to use the web as an economic development tool.